Jack Ma says movies should be made with passionij

With Green Book won best picture at the 91st Academy Awards ceremo

ny, its co-producer Alibaba Pictures Group, the movie unit of the world’s largest e-com

merce company, claimed to be the first internet film company to co-produce an Oscars winning movie.

Jack Ma, chairman of Alibaba Group, said a good movie does not necessarily have to cost

a lot, nor tell an earth-shattering story, according to the Paper, which also said Ma watchedGreen Bo

ok with some of his friends, including Chinese computer giant Lenovo Founder Liu Chuanzhi and Chinese studio Bona P

resident Yu Dong in a Beijing cinema on Monday, though the film will not be officially screened in China until March 1.

He said a good movie is the one which is made with passion and can brin

g positive things to the society. Ma said he has seen the film, a road trip drama based on a tru

e story in segregation era, three times, and in his view, a Chinese movie is actually not far from an Oscars award.

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Vietnam’s path from a mortal enemy to a friendly partn

  United States is particularly appealing to North Korea, who believes a good relationship with the United States can h

elp create the right environment and necessary conditions for achieving North Korea’s new strategic drive toward ec

onomic development,” said Tong Zhao, a fellow at the Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy in Beijing.

  The concept isn’t new, of course. During his time as an Asia expert at the State Department in the Clinton administration, Evans Revere said negoti

ators working with North Korea were even then trying to point them to Vietnam, which was beginning to reap t

he benefits of market reforms and becoming a member of good international standing.

  ”We thought, somewhat naively back then, that this would appeal to the North Koreans gre

atly and that our commitments to work with them on bringing about a modernized economy w

ould be so attractive … that they would stand down from their nuclear weapons program. We were wrong,” Revere said.

  ”If all of these incentives or this incentive-based approach to coaxing North Korea do

wn a new path did not work when they didn’t have nuclear weapons, and it didn’t work to prevent th

em from developing nuclear weapons, why will it work now that they are in effect a nuclear weapons state?”

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The problem with this message is simpledead peop

  need money.”Lankov is one of the few foreigners ever to study at Kim Il Sung University, the country’s most pr

estigious institution of higher learning. Today he runs the Korea Risk Group consultancy, teaches at Kookmin Uni

versity in Seoul and is considered one of the world’s experts on the inner workings of North Korea.

  He says Kim and his top advisers are cold, realistic and brutally rational. They believe that nuclear weapons are the key to their survival given the fate of Moa

mmar Gaddafi, Saddam Hussein and Ukraine as well as Trump’s decision to ditch the Iran nuclear deal.

  ”For the North Koreans, security comes first. And they believe that their security is imperfect if they don’t have some

nuclear weapons. A reduction of nuclear weapons can be negotiated, but denuclearization is a pipe dream,” Lankov said.

  Jackson, the former Defense Department official, is also unconvinced that Kim Jong Un is the reformer many hoped he would be.

  Though Kim is a millennial leader educated in the West, he has n

ow been in power for seven years — during which time he’s overseen more missile and nu

clear tests than his father and grandfather combined, without “meaningful signs” of economic change.

  ”What is different now than the previous 30 years that makes that control-versus-opening tradeoff worthwhile?” Jackson said.

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Green Book’ wins on Oscar night marked by inclusiveness

  ”Green Book” won best picture at the Oscars, marking the final twist on a night of historic firsts, filled with suspense until the final prize.

  Despite controversies surrounding the film, and many outspoken critics, the per

iod drama about race relations in the 1960s felt like a more conventional best-picture choi

ce than its two top rivals, both of which had to overcome key hurdles: “Black Panther” represented the fi

rst superhero movie to earn such recognition, while “Roma” not only would have been the first foreign-lan

guage winner, but was likely hobbled by those who still see its distributor, Netflix, as an upstart in the movie world.

  The Oscars compensated for a host-free ceremony with a nigh

t of breakthroughs, moving briskly through the categories in a concerted effort to sh

orten the run time, amid a night marked by greater inclusiveness and that spread the wealth among the nominees.

  Award voters extended honors to a number of blockbusters, including “Black Panther,” which

earned several technical awards; and “Bohemian Rhapsody,” the biography of Queen and the band’s fron

tman, Freddie Mercury, earned four Oscars — the most of any film — including Rami Malek’s first for the central role.

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photo shared by MP John Lamont showed a smiling Berger

  snapping a selfie of the group as they took their seats in the House of

Commons. But non

e of the group asked a question of the Prime Minister, as she appeared before MPs for her weekly grill

ing, and the defections were barely addressed. The mood in the House of

Commons seemed more subdued than usual.

  The closest May came to acknowledging the issue was when she attacked Corbyn over anti-Semitism in

his party, cited as a reason for some of the defectors leaving his party.

  May said she never thought she would see the day when “a once proud

Labour party was accused of institutional Semiti

sm by a member of that party,” or,

equally, when Jewish people in the UK “were concerned about their future.”

  Responding to those accusations, Corbyn said that “anti-Semitism ha

s no place whatsoever in any of our political parties, in our lives, in our society,” be

fore laying into the Prime Minister for “pretending to negotiate” a Brexit deal with just 37 days to go.

  May, who will travel to Brussels later in the day, maintained that she was still working on alternative arrangements on the

Irish backstop — an insurance policy designed to avoid a hard border between

Northern Ireland and the Republic of Irel

and. She also reiterated her position that a no-deal exit from the EU could only be taken off the table by agreeing a deal.

  Speaking at a press conference later, Allen, Wollaston and Soubry said the Prim

e Minister had been bullied by hard-line Brexiteers onto the brink of a no-deal Brexit.

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Nigeria elections: Explosions heard hours before preside

  Multiple bomb blasts rocked the northern Nigerian city of Maiduguri just hours before presidential polls opened Saturday.

  The explosions happened at a camp for internally displaced refugees at around 5 a.m. local

time Saturday, Nigerian army spokesman Onyeama Nwachukwu told CNN. There were no reports of any deaths or injuries.

  ”There was an attack this morning at the camp by the militants, but the military h

as suppressed it at the moment,” Nwachukwu said, adding that the army was still assessing the situation.

  Journalist Simpa Samson told CNN the militants targeted the Teacher’s Village camp in Maiduguri, the capital of Nigeria’s

Borno state.”The military secured the place almost immediately and has stopped our cameraman from fil

ming, no one was hurt because the bombs landed outside the premises,” Samson told CNN.

  Security is often a concern in Maiduguri, a frequent target of terror group

Boko Haram. The city also has a large population of internally displaced refugees.

  The blasts came as Nigerians prepared to cast their ballots Saturday, a week after the country’s presidential and parliamentary elections were une

xpectedly postponed. It was the third consecutive vote to be delayed in Africa’s largest democracy.

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However, a one-hour extension is less time than many

  voters have spent in line to cast their ballots in the crucial election.

  The incumbent, Muhammadu Buhari, 76, is running against 71 other ca

ndidates, but his main challenger is Atiku Abubakar, a 72-year-old business tycoo

n and former vice president. They are both Muslim candidates from the north of the country.

  When Buhari, a former military ruler, was elected in 2015, it wa

s the first peaceful transition of power in Nigeria. He promised to offer a clean sweep of the old

routine, but many have been left disillusioned and angry at the rising levels of inequality and extreme poverty.

  More than 84 million people registered for the vote in Africa’s largest economic p

ower, according to data from the Independent National Electoral Commission.

  Videos have surfaced on social media reportedly showing the burni

ng of ballot papers and disruption of the electoral process in various parts of the country.

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But dreams of a new reality for Iran screeched to a halt in

  But dreams of a new reality for Iran screeched to a halt in May 2018 when President Donald Tr

ump pulled the United States out of the nuclear deal. Despite repeated certifications that Iran was

sticking to its end of the bargain, Trump unleashed several rounds of stinging sanctions on the country.

  The US president said the penalties aimed to force Iran to end its military adventurism in the region, a demand that Iranian officials have repeatedly brushed off.

  Officially, the sanctions exempt humanitarian goods, such as food, medicine and medicin

al instruments. But in reality, shortages in essential goods have affected households across the country.

  Ali now gets the medicines to treat his daughter’s rare genetic disease, from friends living abr

oad. Her medical bill has more than doubled, forcing him to sell his car, work two jobs, and accu

mulate loans. He says that his entire salary from his day job as a waiter goes toward Dory’s treatment.

  ”I am a wedding singer at night. I try to stay cheery and

keep a smile on my face, but on the inside all I can think about is my daughter,” says Ali.

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uventus beaten at Atletico to leave Ronaldo on brink

  Cristiano Ronaldo was supposed to be the final piece in the Juventus Champions League winning jigsaw.

  For so long, Juventus has dominated in Italy, winning seven successive league titles with an eighth almost inevitable.

  But it is the Champions League crown that it craves. Ronaldo was s

upposed to be the man to deliver for a club that has lost out twice in the final in the past four years.

  When Juventus turned to Ronaldo, a five-time winner, chasing a record-equ

aling sixth Champions League title, it was to inspire the team on nights like Wednesday.

  Only Sevilla (27) and Getafe (23) have conceded more goals to Ronaldo than Atletico Madrid.

  Yet, on a Wednesday night in Madrid, the city where he enjoyed such success with Re

al, he was unable to add to his career tally of 22 against the former neighbor.

  For Atletico Madrid, a team that has felt the full force of Ronaldo’s irrepressible scor

ing record during his time at Real, this 2-0 victory in the first leg of the last 16 tie was particularly sweet.

  Two second-half goals from Uruguayan defensive duo Jose Gimenez and Diego Godin secured the advantage for Diego Simeone’s side.

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The problem is, that new divide doesn’t fall down tradition

party lines — hence the defections from both of the UK’s main parties. And if how you voted on Brexit ultimately dictates how you vote, what do

es that mean in the context of the rest of a political platform?
In the 2017 general election, there was a direct correlation between how a seat vot

ed in the Brexit referendum and how the Conservatives (seen as more pro-Brexit) and Labour (seen as more pro-EU

) performed respectively.
Rob Ford, Professor of Political Science at the University of Manchester and au

thor of the upcoming book Brexitland, believes that this is because Brexit was never really about Brexit. “It’s what we aca

demics call the second ideological dimension. Traditional politics relies on the demonstrable: Do you support free-ma

rket economics or regulation? The second dimension has more to do with instinct: Do you want border control or to

welcome refugees? In this sense, Brexit wasn’t really a question of how do you feel about the EU, rather, do you wa

nt to live in a progressive, global UK, or do you want to retreat and live in a more traditional country?”

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